Ideal Materials


This Cement Alternative Absorbs CO2 Like A Sponge

Source: geek.com Published: November 14, 2014 Cement has been called the foundation of modern civilization, the stuff of highways, bridges, sidewalks and buildings of all sizes. But its production comes with a huge carbon footprint. Environmental chemist David Stone...

Egyptian Village Goes Solar

Source: ecowatch.com Published: October 11, 2016 Kristin Falzon Egypt’s first solar-powered village is up and running in the Bahariya Oasis. KarmBuild’s Tayebat Workers Village provides shelter for 350 people and was built with 90 percent local, natural...

Living Shorelines: How Nature Can Help Us Beat Back Rising Seas

Source: grist.org Published: September 20, 2016 By Jeremy Deaton Click here to watch “Living shorelines: How nature can help us beat back rising seas”: https://youtu.be/KcbTD_Uaa7U Next year, New York will break ground on the first section of a U-shaped wall around...

Cracks In The Surface: Why Grey Firms Will Have To Go Green

Source: economist.com Published: August 25, 2016   THE cement industry is one of the world’s most polluting: it accounts for 5% of man-made carbon-dioxide emissions each year. Making this most useful of glues requires vast quantities of energy and water. Calcium...

11 Green Building Materials That Are Way Better Than Concrete

Source: inhabitat.com Published: July 08, 2016 by Emily Peckenham 1. Straw Bales Rather than relying on new research and technology, straw bale building hearkens back to the days when homes were built from natural, locally-occurring materials. Straw bales are used to...

Roads Paved with Pig Manure Could Mean A Cleaner Future

Source: popsci.com Published: June 28, 2016 By Mary Beth Griggs Pig manure could pave the road to a new sustainable asphalt, thanks to civil engineer Ellie Fini and a team at North Carolina A&T State University. Fini and her partners have filed patents on the...

Leaf Dinnerware to Replace Plastic and Styrofoam

Source: thehomestead.guru Published: May 17, 2016 By Catherine Bleish A University in Thailand has spent the past year developing a new type of waterproof bowl made of leaves. The women behind this leaf dinnerware felt called to design a replacement for Styrofoam when...